Improving Emergency Care: Free Guidebook SCD

Anemia word cloud concept
Anemia word cloud concept

NICHQ, the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality, today announces a new free guidebook: “Sickle Cell Pain in the Emergency Department: A Guide to Improving Care,”

NICHQ, the National Institute for Children’s Health Quality, today announces “Sickle Cell Pain in the Emergency Department: A Guide to Improving Care,”  a step-by-step manual for anyone on the front lines of acute care, from emergency room (ER) doctors and nurses, to hematology specialists. The guide, launched on World Sickle Cell Day, is the result of a five-year collaboration between 15 multidisciplinary health care provider teams nationwide. Throughout the process, teams traded lessons learned and best practices for improving treatment for adults and children with sickle cell disease (SCD) in the ER.
An inherited red blood disorder, SCD is a chronic illness characterized by anemia and unbearable bouts of pain, so providing relief quickly is crucial to treatment. This incurable disease can lead to declining health, poor quality of life and early mortality. NICHQ Strategic Project Director Dr. Suzette Oyeku, said, “Sickle cell disease patients wait in excruciating pain longer than they have to for treatment. Guidelines do exist, but they have not been consistently implemented, particularly in acute care settings. Our guide was designed to help providers bridge this gap.”
NICHQ’s SCD work was funded by The U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) which oversees the SCD Treatment Demonstration Program and the SCD Newborn Screening Program. As lead facilitator for the programs, NICHQ was responsible for organizing and reporting on meetings; collecting, analyzing and distributing best practice data; and serving as the liaison between HRSA and the teams. The two projects yielded many results in improving care for SCD patients in the ER. These included a reduction in the wait time for evaluation by 69 percent and a 29 percent improvement in the time between triage and receiving pain medication. One of the most significant outputs of the teams’ extensive work is “Sickle Cell Pain in the Emergency Department: A Guide to Improving Care.” The online publication offers best practice findings such as standardized order sets, a recommendation to consider using intranasal fentanyl and a color-coded, full body chart, reviewed by patients and doctors, as a standard pain assessment tool.
According to HRSA Project Officer Dr. E. Donnell Ivy, NICHQ and the Treatment Demonstration and Newborn Screening program grantees have pulled together an excellent resource. He said, “On World Sickle Cell Day and as Sickle Cell Awareness Month approaches, the timing for sharing this comprehensive guide could not be better. We congratulate NICHQ and all of our grantees on advancing the quality of care for these patients. As a result of their work, thousands of patients, from coast to coast, will receive better treatment in the ER.”

Psychological Therapies: Sickle Cell and Pain

Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 May 8;5:CD001916. [Epub ahead of print]
Psychological therapies for sickle cell disease and pain.
Anie KA1, Green J.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Sickle cell disease comprises a group of genetic blood disorders. It occurs when the sickle haemoglobin gene is inherited from both parents. The effects of the condition are: varying degrees of anaemia which, if severe, can reduce mobility; a tendency for small blood capillaries to become blocked causing pain in muscle and bone commonly known as ‘crises’; damage to major organs such as the spleen, liver, kidneys, and lungs; and increased vulnerability to severe infections. There are both medical and non-medical complications, and treatment is usually symptomatic and palliative in nature. Psychological interventions for individuals with sickle cell disease might complement current medical treatment, and studies of their efficacy have yielded encouraging results. This is an update of a previously published Cochrane Review.
OBJECTIVES:
To examine the evidence that psychological interventions improve the ability of people with sickle cell disease to cope with their condition.
SEARCH METHODS:
We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and the Internet, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group’s Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 17 February 2015.
SELECTION CRITERIA:
All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing psychological interventions with no (psychological) intervention in people with sickle cell disease.
DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS:
Both authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies.
MAIN RESULTS:
Twelve studies were identified in the searches and seven of these were eligible for inclusion in the review. Five studies, involving 260 participants, provided data for analysis. One study showed that cognitive behaviour therapy significantly reduced the affective component of pain (feelings about pain), mean difference -0.99 (95% confidence interval -1.62 to -0.36), but not the sensory component (pain intensity), mean difference 0.00 (95% confidence interval -9.39 to 9.39). One study of family psycho-education was not associated with a reduction in depression. Another study evaluating cognitive behavioural therapy had inconclusive results for the assessment of coping strategies, and showed no difference between groups assessed on health service utilisation. In addition, family home-based cognitive behavioural therapy did not show any difference compared to disease education. One study of patient education on health beliefs showed a significant improvement in attitudes towards health workers, mean difference -4.39 (95% CI -6.45 to -2.33) and medication, mean difference -1.74 (95% CI -2.98 to -0.50). Nonetheless, these results may not apply across all ages, severity of sickle cell disease, types of pain (acute or chronic), or setting.
AUTHORS’ CONCLUSIONS:
Evidence for the efficacy of psychological therapies in sickle cell disease is currently limited. This systematic review has clearly identified the need for well-designed, adequately-powered, multicentre randomised controlled trials assessing the effectiveness of specific interventions in sickle cell disease.
PMID: 25966336 [PubMed – as supplied by publisher]